New Zealand is the land of idyllic beauty, sprawling over immense natural expanse along with a well bred culture. Not only is this place peaceful but also a home to one of the most courteous people. But more than that, it is the perfect balance of life and work this country offers that has made it one of the best countries to migrate to. Apex Visas says that the work life in New Zealand is one of the best in the world, governed by labor laws that make it efficacious for the employees to work without stressing them.

One of the best ways to migrate to New Zealand is through The Skilled Migrant Category (SMC). SMC allows applicants to move to New Zealand to work and live permanently. The first step in this direction is to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI). The EOI requires an applicant to declare details regarding one self, family, academic background and skill-set possessed. The mentioned facts need to be substantiated with relevant documents. And while submitting the EOI, an applicant can also claim points. If these points are above 100, then the application goes to the EOI Pool. Then based upon the score, EOI for an applicant is selected from the pool. An EOI in EOI pool for more than 6 months lapses automatically.

If an applicant is granted resident visa, then he/she will be required to stay in New Zealand as a resident. IF the applicant has acquired visa on the basis of a job, then joining that job within three months of landing in New Zealand is a must. The applicant also is bound to remain in that particular job for at least 3 months.

Apex Visas says that apart from various advantages, there is small mandate that Skilled Migrant Visa demands.  Applicant, who has been given a job search visa, within three months of the offer, should return the application form for the job search visa. Applicant should be able to prove that he/she is capable of supporting self in New Zealand. In addition, he/she will have to show the availability of finance to purchase tickets to native country in case applicant will have to leave New Zealand.

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